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Inland Empire Edition June 2015 : Page 1

TAKE ME HOME! B usiness n ews O nline @ ieBJPuB.COM PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. POSTAGE PAID EDDM RETAIL T HE I NLAND E MPIRE v OluMe 2, n uMBer 6 Local Postal Customer B USINESS R EVIEW ™ s erving T he i nland e MPire B usiness C OMMuniTy J une 2015 B y r ePreSentAtive m Ark t AkAnO The Inland Empire Strikes Back Helping Veterans d ’ t t c h , B r S B ’ c and Servicemembers c A d c B J m Land on Their Feet On t ell he OAStAl AterS ut iverSide And An OuntieS re riving AlifOrniA S OmeBAck AthewS ernArdinO y Oe Scan QR code with a smart phone to access smart reader This Memorial Day, we re-member those who sacrificed so much for our nation and gave their lives in the name of freedom, not just because of the uniform they wore, but because they represented the values that make our nation the greatest in the world. And out of respect of their sacrifice, we should be doing all we can to take care of the veterans and servicemem-bers who served alongside them. Our veterans should be [See Economy Page 3] The Empire is back. Of course, you shouldn’t hold your breath waiting for a statewide celebration of the remarkable comeback of Southern California’s Inland Empire which encompasses Riverside and San Bernardino counties and their 4.4 million inhabitants. When it comes to this huge section of the state with a population greater than Oregon’s if the good news isn’t being ignored, it’s being spun as bad. The Inland Empire is by far California’s least fashion-able region. That’s because it resembles the hotter, gritti-er, more working-class place the state is actually becom-ing, not the beautiful, wealthy place we aspire to be. When the I.E. is growing, such gains are dismissed as unwanted or unnatural sprawl; when the I.E. struggles, such pain is consid-ered to be just rewards for an impudent dystopia. The glare on the I.E. was espe-cially harsh during the Great Recession, with some pinning the global economic meltdown on its foreclosure crisis. Unfor-tunately, that narrative proved so durable that it’s obscured the Inland Empire’s startling recov-ery. An unemployment rate that topped 14 percent in late 2009 has been cut in half. Housing prices have roared back. If there really is a “California come-back” like one the governor is touting, the I.E. is driving it. If you live near the coast, you may not have heard that the Inland Empire has been lead-ing the state in new business creation or in the construction of industrial space. . Or that the I.E. has been consistently among the state’s leaders in job growth. [See EMPIRE Page 3] B y A lice S ullivAn , P reSident /ceO The Temecula Valley Cham-ber of Commerce is proud to announce the launch of our rebranding. No matter the size, nature, or medium of a local The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce is Rebranding able platform to accommodate them. Tradition-ally, Chambers of Commerce tocus solely on network-ing events to promote their doing just that, with education-al classes for new businesses, sponsorship opportunities for those seeking exposure, part-nerships for companies wish-ing to build local alliances, and much more. The Temecula Valley Cham-ber of Commerce encompasses multiple services for a variety of business needs. What sets the TVCC apart is its ability to cater to a diverse range of busi-ness types using customized strategies for each. By divid-ing the Chambers resources into tour membership options, we will be able to better serve the business community by honing in on the services that Time Is Running Out For Riverside County Residents That Wish To Capture Solar Incentives c OmPAny ’ S e xPAnSiOn i n r iverSide c Ounty B ringS l OcAl J OBS A nd c Ountywide r eBAte B y P riScillA A rvizu Sullivan Solar Power, a lead-ing California renewable energy company, has moved into a vast new office in River -side, California. The new office accommodates the compa-ny’s growing demand for resi-dential and commercial solar energy services and expand-ing staff in the Inland Empire. The new office expansion has come quickly after the compa-ny launched a countywide solar incentive program for residents in Riverside County. Centrally located at 2111 Iowa Ave., Sullivan Solar Power’s new location is five times the space of Sullivan Solar Power’s previous Riverside location. After growing out of space in their previous location for both staff and equipment, the 10,142 square feet space will house administrative offices and a large warehouse. The company expects to fill the new ware -house space with more modules than anticipated due to the increased demand for solar in the region. “Riverside County is home to some of California’s highest business, the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce will directly continue to position itself as a place “Where Busi-ness Meets Opportunity.” As the Temecula Business commu-nity grows and diversities, so follows its needs, and the TVCC has modeled itself on an adapt-members and services. Howev-er, in a place and time where many businesses have outgrown that model (or in the case of online markets, may never have fit into it properly at all), a Chamber must offer a variety of platforms tor business connec-tions. 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Helping Veterans And Servicemembers Land On Their Feet

Mark Takano

This Memorial Day, we remember those who sacrificed so much for our nation and gave their lives in the name of freedom, not just because of the uniform they wore, but because they represented the values that make our nation the greatest in the world.

And out of respect of their sacrifice, we should be doing all we can to take care of the veterans and servicemembers who served alongside them. Our veterans should be receiving top-notch care and should receive as much assistance as possible as they integrate back into civilian life.

The fact is that many servicemembers and veterans are drawn to serve because of the benefits they are promised, including tuition assistance and GI Bill benefits. We are indebted to them for their sacrifice and these benefits are well deserved.

So I was surprised to learn that some for-profit college institutions were intentionally recruiting servicemembers and veterans for the purpose of receiving their guaranteed benefits. As we now know, many of those for-profit colleges were defrauding and misleading students, as 30 state Attorneys General, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Securities Exchange Commission, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and the Department of Justice are investigating for-profit colleges for fraudulent practices.

Last month, Corinthian Colleges Inc., which owns Everest College, closed its remaining campuses, leaving more than 16,000 students in limbo and thousands of employees without a job. It is estimated that the closure of Corinthian Colleges Inc. could cost American taxpayers $214 million through loan relief.

However, servicemembers and veterans are unable to receive the same kind of relief, as they are unable to reset their benefits, even in cases where they were defrauded or misled by a for-profit college.

In order to fix this, I introduced an amendment that would restore eligibility for Department of Defense benefits, including tuition assistance, if an individual is unable to complete their education due to the closure of the school. Even though the Republican- controlled House Rules Committee refused to consider the amendment, I will continue to explore other avenues to help servicemembers and other students who have been taken advantage of.

If we truly care about our veterans and servicemembers, we should be doing all we can to ensure they are able to live productive lives and contribute to our economy.

On this Memorial Day, let’s remember those who paid the ultimate price, and honor their memory by recommitting ourselves to taking care of our servicemembers and veterans and ensuring that they are able to land on their feet once their service is completed.

Read the full article at http://mypub.iebjpub.com/article/Helping+Veterans+And+Servicemembers+Land+On+Their+Feet/2025307/261122/article.html.

The Inland Empire Strikes Back

Joe Mathews

DON’T TELL THE COAS TAL HATERS, BUT RIVERSIDE AND SAN BERNARDINO COUNTIES ARE DRIVING CALIFORNIA’S COMEBACK

The Empire is back.

Of course, you shouldn’t hold your breath waiting for a statewide celebration of the remarkable comeback of Southern California’s Inland Empire which encompasses Riverside and San Bernardino counties and their 4.4 million inhabitants. When it comes to this huge section of the state with a population greater than Oregon’s if the good news isn’t being ignored, it’s being spun as bad.

The Inland Empire is by far California’s least fashionable region. That’s because it resembles the hotter, grittier, more working-class place the state is actually becoming, not the beautiful, wealthy place we aspire to be. When the I.E. is growing, such gains are dismissed as unwanted or unnatural sprawl; when the I.E. struggles, such pain is considered to be just rewards for an impudent dystopia.

The glare on the I.E. was especially harsh during the Great Recession, with some pinning the global economic meltdown on its foreclosure crisis. Unfortunately, that narrative proved so durable that it’s obscured the Inland Empire’s startling recovery. An unemployment rate that topped 14 percent in late 2009 has been cut in half. Housing prices have roared back. If there really is a “California comeback” like one the governor is touting, the I.E. is driving it.

If you live near the coast, you may not have heard that the Inland Empire has been leading the state in new business creation or in the construction of industrial space. . Or that the I.E. has been consistently among the state’s leaders in job growth.

The really good news is that this turnaround is multifaceted. The region’s logistics industry, which warehouses and moves goods coming in and out of the ports, is booming, with a strong dollar inspiring a spike in imports. Low gas prices are helping the region’s transportation firms and commuters. And retail is back, in a big way. The high-end grocery store chain Whole Foods is even making a push into the area.

Of course, this sort of growth—in housing, in retail, in logistics—is considered gauche in California’s loftier (and leftier) precincts. As Inland Empire Economic Partnership chief economist John Husing has pointed out, California’s environmental regulations are essentially at war with four major sectors that could produce more prosperity there—logistics, construction, manufacturing, and mining. And the drought is making the I. E. even more unpopular; photos of drier areas of the Empire often accompany newspaper stories blaming water shortages on supposedly “limitless” growth in today’s low-growth California.

Of course, the I.E. has real problems. Poverty rates are among the highest in the state. The education levels of its population are abysmal; only one in five adults in the Inland Empire have a college degree (compared to 40 percent in the Bay Area). And the region’s public health statistics are ugly, with the Inland Empire suffering California’s biggest shortages of primary care and specialist physicians.

The good news about all these problems is the enormous potential for improvement. The health care industry is starting to take off inland. The leaders of UC Riverside and Cal State San Bernardino have launched an effort to double the number of local students finishing their degrees. Some experts predict the region’s logistics growth will eventually draw more manufacturing.

If the comeback continues, the I.E.’s problems will have more to do with its success. Will the region run out of space for warehouses? Will rising housing costs price out too many families? Will too many people leave the expensive coast and create more traffic?

You can be sure that Californians will hear more about these problems than the I.E.’s successes. But these will be good problems for a region to have. As Alien Ant Farm—a band with Riverside roots—likes to sing, “These days are great. There’s work to do.” Joe Mathews is California & innovation editor for Zócalo Public Square, for which he writes the Connecting California column.

Read the full article at http://mypub.iebjpub.com/article/The+Inland+Empire+Strikes+Back/2025309/261122/article.html.

Time Is Running Out For Riverside County Residents That Wish To Capture Solar Incentives

Priscilla Arvizu

COMPANY’S EXPA NSION IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY BRINGS LOCAL JOBS AND COUNTYWIDE REBATE

Sullivan Solar Power, a leading California renewable energy company, has moved into a vast new office in Riverside, California. The new office accommodates the company’s growing demand for residential and commercial solar energy services and expanding staff in the Inland Empire. The new office expansion has come quickly after the company launched a countywide solar incentive program for residents in Riverside County.

Centrally located at 2111 Iowa Ave., Sullivan Solar Power’s new location is five times the space of Sullivan Solar Power’s previous Riverside location. After growing out of space in their previous location for both staff and equipment, the 10,142 square feet space will house administrative offices and a large warehouse. The company expects to fill the new warehouse space with more modules than anticipated due to the increased demand for solar in the region.

“Riverside County is home to some of California’s highest solar adoption cities and we are excited to service the increasing demand in this area with plans for perpetual expansion,” said Daniel Sullivan, founder and president of Sullivan Solar Power, “Our goal is to help Riverside County reach its renewable energy goals and change the way the Inland Empire generates electricity.”

The company’s program for Riverside residents is currently in its final phases of funding and will only run through the remainder of the year. A typical Riverside County Solar Program participant is installing 6,000-watts of solar capacity, eliminating their Southern California Edison electric bill and will receive a tax credit of $6,925. In addition to the Riverside rebate program, the Federal tax credit is also expiring soon, ending in 2016.

For more information about the Riverside County Solar Program please visit RiversideCountySolarProgram.org or call 1-800-SULLIVAN.

Read the full article at http://mypub.iebjpub.com/article/Time+Is+Running+Out+For+Riverside+County+Residents+That+Wish+To+Capture+Solar+Incentives/2025311/261122/article.html.

The Temecula Valley Chamber Of Commerce Is Rebranding

Alice Sullivan

The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce is proud to announce the launch of our rebranding. No matter the size, nature, or medium of a local business, the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce will directly continue to position itself as a place “Where Business Meets Opportunity.” As the Temecula Business community grows and diversities, so follows its needs, and the TVCC has modeled itself on an adaptable platform to accommodate them. Traditionally, Chambers of Commerce tocus solely on networking events to promote their members and services. However, in a place and time where many businesses have outgrown that model (or in the case of online markets, may never have fit into it properly at all), a Chamber must offer a variety of platforms tor business connections.

The Temecula Chamber is doing just that, with educational classes for new businesses, sponsorship opportunities for those seeking exposure, partnerships for companies wishing to build local alliances, and much more. The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce encompasses multiple services for a variety of business needs. What sets the TVCC apart is its ability to cater to a diverse range of business types using customized strategies for each. By dividing the Chambers resources into tour membership options, we will be able to better serve the business community by honing in on the services that are relevant to their needs. What does this mean tor you and your business? With these four options you can tailor your membership to achieve your business objectives. These four categories are listed below.

Education: The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce offers a wide variety of educational opportunities to its members. Through workshops , speaking engagements, and personalized counseling, chamber members gather insight on common business and marketing problems and their solutions.

Marketing & Event Promotion: The Chamber offers the ability to sponsor events and be featured on various publications and collateral distributed by the organization. This gives members an opportunity to market themselves with less legwork and a broader reach than face to face networking strategies. Networking Opportunities: Many of those in the business community still greatly benefit from face to face contact with their peers. The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce hosts a multitude of events throughout the year- both intimate and expansive- to bring business persons together tor the opportunity to network. These events are designed to suit a wide variety of business types and availabilities, and often coincide with educational workshops to increase networking effectiveness.

Online Promotion: The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce wishes to cater to all business types, including the growing number ot companies whose target markets increasingly come from an internet presence. For these companies, as well as those who do not have time to market themselves personally, the Chamber offers opportunities for online promotion.

The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to growing a healthy business community through the support of its individual members and community alliances. TVCC has demonstrated a proven track record since 1966, advocating for the well-being of the business community as a whole by connecting local businesses with the tools they need to be a thriving success. The TVCC is continually positioning itself as an invaluable business resource and is looking forward to welcoming new members, while continuing to meet the unique and individual needs of its current members with the belief that when one business thrives, the business community as a whole succeeds.

For additional information contact the Chamber at 951.676-5090 or email asullivan@temecula.org.

Read the full article at http://mypub.iebjpub.com/article/The+Temecula+Valley+Chamber+Of+Commerce+Is+Rebranding/2025353/261122/article.html.

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